Danish Author Hans Christian Anderson/The Fir Tree/Photographer Starr Ockenga/Christmas Greeting Cards / Christmas Tree / Christmas Cards/ Christmas Trees / The Fir Tree /Author Hans Christian Anderson/ Photographer Star OckengaClassic Fine Art Christmas Greeting Cards / The Fir Tree / Starr Ockenga /Christians Hans Anderson

CHRISTMAS CARD

CHRISTMAS CARD
THE FIR TREE / PHOTOGRAPH BY STARR OCKENGA / ITEM NO: 9625

VERSE INSIDE OF CHRISTMAS CARD

VERSE INSIDE OF CHRISTMAS CARD
THE FIR TREE

POEM ON BACKSIDE OF CHRISTMAS CARD

POEM ON BACKSIDE OF CHRISTMAS CARD
THE FIR TREE / Author by Hans Christian Anderson

Thursday, October 6, 2016

GREETINGS

GREETINGS 

Greeting is an act of communication in which human beings intentionally make their presence known to each other, to show attention to, and to suggest a type of relationship (usually cordial) or social status (formal or informal) between individuals or groups of people coming in contact with each other. Greetings sometimes are used just prior to a conversation or to greet in passing, such as on a sidewalk or trail. While greeting customs are highly culture and situation-specific and may change within a culture depending on social status and relationship, they exist in all known human cultures. Greetings can be expressed both audibly and physically, and often involve a combination of the two. This topic excludes military and ceremonial salutes but includes rituals other than gestures. A greeting, or salutation, can also be expressed in written communications, such as letters and emails.
Some epochs and cultures have had very elaborate greeting rituals, for example, greeting of a sovereign. Conversely,secret societies have often furtive or arcane greeting gestures and rituals, such as a secret handshake, which allow members to recognize each other.
In some languages and cultures, the same word or gesture is used as both greeting and farewell. Examples are "Good day" in English, "As-Salamualaikum" in Arabic, "Aloha" in Hawaiian, "Shalom" in Hebrew, "Namaste" in Hindi and "Ciao" in Italian. The bow and handshake are also used for both greeting and leave taking.


Wikipedia contributors. "Greeting." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 28 Sep. 2016. Web. 28 Sep. 2016.

Saturday, October 1, 2016

The Fir-Tree

"The Fir-Tree" (Danish: Grantræet) is a literary fairy tale by Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen (1805–1875). The tale is about a fir tree so anxious to grow up, so anxious for greater things, that he cannot appreciate living in the moment. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Snow Queen" in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel. One scholar indicates that "The Fir-Tree" was the first of Andersen's fairy tales to express a deep pessimism.


The Fir-Tree. (2016, June 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 05:18, October 2, 2016, from

Early Life of Danish Author Hans Christian Anderson

Hans Christian Andersen was born in the town of Odense, Denmark, on 2 April 1805. He was an only child. Andersen's father, also Hans, considered himself related to nobility. His paternal grandmother had told his father that their family had in the past belonged to a higher social class,[4] but investigations prove these stories unfounded.[4][5] Theories suggesting that Andersen may have been an illegitimate son of King Christian VIII of Denmark persist.[4]Andersen's father, who had received an elementary education, introduced Andersen to literature, reading to him Arabian Nights.[6] Andersen's mother, Anne Marie Andersdatter, was uneducated and worked as a washerwoman following his father's death in 1816; she remarried in 1818.[6] Andersen was sent to a local school for poor children where he received a basic education and was forced to support himself, working as an apprentice for a weaver and, later, for a tailor. At 14, he moved to Copenhagen to seek employment as an actor. Having an excellent soprano voice, he was accepted into the Royal Danish Theatre, but his voice soon changed. A colleague at the theatre told him that he considered Andersen a poet. Taking the suggestion seriously, Andersen began to focus on writing.Andersen's childhood home in OdenseJonas Collin, director of the Royal Danish Theatre, felt a great affection for Andersen and sent him to a grammar school in Slagelse, persuading King Frederick VI to pay part of the youth's education.[7] Andersen had already published his first story, "The Ghost at Palnatoke's Grave" (1822). Though not a keen student, he also attended school at Elsinore until 1827.[8]He later said his years in school were the darkest and most bitter of his life. At one school, he lived at his schoolmaster's home. There he was abused in order "to improve his character", he was told. He later said the faculty had discouraged him from writing in general, causing him to enter a state of depression.[citation needed]Wikipedia contributors. "Hans Christian Andersen." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 1 Oct. 2016. Web. 1 Oct. 2016.

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Photograph by Starr Ockenga

The information below about Photographer Starr Ockenga was discovered August 10, 2016 on the Penguin Random House website. Starr Ockenga won national acclaim for her first book on gardens, Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden, which received an American Horticultural Society Book Award for 1999. She continued to document American gardens with Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions, published in 2001. Her work has appeared in numerous national publications, including Horticulture and Country Home. She received her master’s degree in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design and has been granted fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Artists Foundation. Her photographs have been exhibited in museums and galleries across the United States and abroad. Formerly an associate professor of photography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she now divides her time between a studio in New York City and her garden in the Hudson River Valley.

Danish Author Hans Christian Anderson

Hans Christian Andersen (/ˈhɑːnz ˈkrɪstʃən ˈændərsən/; Danish: [hanˀs ˈkʰʁæsd̥jan ˈɑnɐsn̩] ( listen); often referred to in Scandinavia as H. C. Andersen; 2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875) was a Danish author. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen's popularity is not limited to children; his stories, called eventyr in Danish, express themes that transcend age and nationality.Andersen's fairy tales, which have been translated into more than 125 languages,[1] have become culturally embedded in the West's collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well.[2] Some of his most famous fairy tales include "The Emperor's New Clothes", "The Little Mermaid", "The Nightingale", "The Snow Queen", "The Ugly Duckling", "Thumbelina", and many more.His stories have inspired ballets, animated and live-action films, and plays.[3]

Hans Christian Andersen. (2016, October 1). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:49, October 1, 2016, from